We’ve Got the Whole World in our Hands

Regional focus:  The Whole World

Author & Illustrator: Rafael Lopez

Genre:  children’s literature

Collecting my thoughts for Sail Away Story is a weekend indulgence.  My day job is Director of La Puerta Abierta School and Library in Santiago Atitlan, Guatemala.  Last month, our project embarked on a large-scale fundraising campaign to ensure a forever home for our school and outreach programs.  We’ve been busy sharing our story of growth and achievements with supporters and potential donors.

Recently I was challenged by a family friend from California who asked,  “How does a contribution to a school project in Guatemala affect me?”

For a second I was silent and stunned.  I felt myself crawling inward, like a turtle withdrawing into her shell; clearly the potential donor and I  had different global perspectives and priorities.  And then, I found my voice, which wasn’t exactly a roar,  but more like the steady and stable dialog of a melodious blackbird in my garden at  dawn.

“How does supporting education in Guatemala affect me?”

 Let’s talk!

We  live in a world that is an intricate  web of connections and interdependencies.  When we are encouraged to think about what is equitable and just, we can see beyond the initial “me.”  We become aware of the wider world and our role as global citizens.  We understand the complexities of social injustices and feel inspired to be agents of change for the well-being of our world.

If we are to examine the question in more tangible terms, we can connect current issues of immigration of Central Americans north, as they flee social and political injustices.  Among the long list of injustices sits the right to a dignified education.  While I understand that I am oversimplifying complex issues (I am a preschool teacher after all:), I recognize that if we, as global citizens were able to invest in education across boundaries, some families would have more investment in staying in their country of origin and have less necessity to flee.  And now let’s imagine that those children who stayed in their country of origin and received a dignified education grew up with the skills and tools to be agents of change, and then invested in their community, both locally and globally.  Might this one initial act of kindness affect you?  I’ll let you decide.

While I was born and raised in California, I have spent more than half my life in Central America.  My husband was born in Brazil and his parents are Belgian.

My daughters (E) who is twelve and (C) who is nine were born in Guatemala and their first words were in Spanish, “agua,” “mama” “nana.”

While there is a sprinkling of expatriates in our town, the foreign community is small, and my daughters are often asked in casual conversation to share their stories.  Visitors will probe, “Where are you from?”  What languages do you speak?”  “Who are you parents?”  and eventually, “What is you nationality?”

The last question in particular, one that seems simple and straight forward, takes curious minds down a windy road of explanation.  (E) might share that her mom is from the United States and that her father is Belgian, but born in Brazil, and that she was born in Guatemala and possesses both Guatemalan and US citizenship. At the end of the dialog, she’s likely to confess that she feels Guatemalan but looks North American.  (C) might say that technically she’s Guatemalan, but that she is also a mix of Belgium, the United States and Brazil.  After a long-winded dialog (she likes to talk), she’d reveal that she’s a global citizen, a child of the world.

At then, my heart skips a beat, as I imagine a world without boarders, where empathy flows across religion, culture and nationality. When packaged in a child’s perspective, world-peace almost seems attainable.

As I struggle to make sense of the psychology of adults, I often look to children’s books that illustrate in both words and pictures complicated topics in approachable packages.  The joyful picture book, We’ve Got the Whole World in our Hands, by Rafael Lopez gracefully brings insight into the concept of Global Citizenship.

The next time someone asks “How does supporting education in Guatemala affect me?” I’ll be better prepared.  I may suggest that they read We’ve Got the Whole World in our Hands, or invite them to join a class at La Puerta Abierta.  

I might simply share the wise words of Rafael Lopez, “It seems wherever we look these days, there is talk of the things that divide us.  With this book, I wanted to express a message of hope to children that we are all in this together, that each and every child is an essential part of the big, amazing planet we call home.”

About:

Lopez’s We’ve Got the Whole World in our Hands brings new life and perspective to a beloved  folk song first published in 1927.  Using the metaphor of a ball of yarn which soars across the book’s  pages, across boarders,  and with the aid of his vibrant illustrations, Lopez demonstrates how we are all connected and celebrated in the spirit of friendship,  love and peace.

What I love:

  • Lopez’s illustrations are cheerful and diverse.
  • Lopez uses a very simple concept as a tool for complex topics and discussion.
  • Lopez has also published a bilingual (English-Spanish) version of his book.

Discussion:

  • In your own words, what does the metaphor “We’ve got the whole world in our hands,” mean?
  • Have you ever helped another child, adult, or animal?  What inspired you to lend a hand? How did you feel while you were helping?
  • Do you feel that you are similar or different from children who live in other parts of the world?  Why or why not?

Connections:

  • Become a global citizen.  Learn about children from different cultures or countries than your own.
  • Create a collage of the diversity that can be found across the globe.  Keep in mind that there is diversity amongst people and geography.
  • Exchange letters with a pen-pal in another city, state or country.  Ask questions. Share stories.
  • Represent the metaphor “We’ve got the whole world in our hands,” in a drawing.

 

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At the Same Moment Around the World

Regional focus:  The Whole Wide World

Author and Illustrator:  Clotilde Perrin

Genre:  children’s literature

It’s 9:00 am on a Sunday morning in Brussels, Belgium and the colors from my window have only now changed from black to gray.  My daughters are preparing for the cold outside as they layer their sleepy, warm,  bodies  in tights, pants, shirts, sweaters, scarves, thick socks and mittens.  Soon, they will journey to the neighborhood bakery for fresh croissants and petit pain au chocolat which they will bring back to the apartment in a paper bag.  In the meantime, I’ll heat milk for hot chocolate,  and water for black tea.

We are 7 hours earlier than our friends in Guatemala, three hours earlier that our friends in Brazil, 9 hours earlier than our family in California and 4.5 hours behind  our friends in India! These are the time zones I have saved on the world clock app on my iPhone.  Nearly every day my youngest child Chloe, will ask about her friends in various places around the world, and she will wonder where they are and what they are doing at the same exact moment.  When she is on the metro at 4:00 PM in Brussels, her best friend Lupita in Guatemala might be making tortillas with her mom where its 10:00 AM and her friend Khushi in the Indian Himalayas  might be crushing cardamom and ginger to make a spicy cup of chai tea to keep her warm where it’s 8:30 PM.  Chloe and I will marvel over the idea that not only the hour changes according to time zone, but also the daily activities of children around the world change.  Her morning commute to school in Guatemala which includes a tuc-tuc, a boat, and a walk looks very different from her Belgian cousin’s commute.   Nell rides her bike to school every morning.

As an adult I continue to be mesmerized by the mini worlds within our big world. The act of boarding a plane in Central America  and exiting an airport in Europe 15 hours later  still feels like a feat of the future, a science fiction fantasy.  I imagine the magic of travel is all the more potent for the child mind.

About:

In Clotilde Perrin’s whimsical book, At the Same Moment Around the World, we peek into the lives of individuals around the globe and catch a glimpse of the lives of Benedict drinking a cup of hot chocolate in France, Mitko catching the school bus in Bulgaria, and Lilu enjoying lunch on a Himalayan mountain. Clotilde Perrin takes readers eastward from the Greenwich meridian, from day to night, with each page portraying one of (the original) 24 time zones.

What I love:

  • Time zones are fascinating and confusing for children and adults alike.  “At the Same Moment Around the World” provides a fun and informative platform to teach children about the topic.
  • Perrin’s illustrations are whimsical and magical.
  • “At the Same Moment Around the World” creates a platform for young readers to learn about children in other countries and cultures.

Themes:  culture, time zones, diversity

Discussion:

  • Do you have friends who live in countries different from your own?  What do you think they are doing in this moment?
  • How is it possible that it might be day in one country and night in another?
  • What would snapshots of your day in different moments  look like (7:00 AM, 1:00 PM, 4:00 PM)?

Connections:

Sun Unit Study - Day and Night (4)

 

Nine O’ Clock Lullaby

Last summer, I had the opportunity to travel to India with my eldest daughter, Emma.  On our journey from Guatemala, we stopped in New York and Dubai, and passed through  many time zones.  When we finally arrived at our destination, we were 11.5 hours ahead of our friends and family back home (yes, India is one of the few countries that has a .5 hour change in time).  Emma and I marveled at the concept of her sister preparing for  the day to begin as we were putting on pajamas .  We wondered what her grandmother in Belgium was doing when is was 9:00 PM in India, and what her cousins in California were up to as we gazed at the stars over the Himalayas.  When it’s 9:00 PM in Guatemala, what time is it in your home?

Regional focus:  The Whole Wide World

Author:  Marilyn Singer

Illustrator: Frane Lessac

Genre:  children’s literature

Discover what is happening around the world in different time zones. A young girl learns that when it′s 9 P.M. in Brooklyn, it′s 10 P.M. in Puerto Rico, and midnight on the mid-Atlantic. Far from the busyness of New York traffic, the Puerto Rican night is filled with conga music, sweet rice, and fruit ice. In India, villagers begin their morning chores as well… ropes squeak, buckets splash, and bracelets jangle. Meanwhile, in Australia, a sly kookaburra is ready for a noontime feast.

What I love:

  • A great book to explore the concept of time zones, which is abstract for children.
  • The rhyming in the book is fun to read.
  • Illustrations are bright and colorful.

Themes: world exploration, time zones, culture

Discussion:

  • How can it be day in some countries and night in others at the same moment?
  • Are there any countries from the story that you would like to visit? Why?
  • What does 9:00 PM at night look like in your house?

Connections:

  • Make a time book and investigate what might be happening in four different countries at one particular time. Illustrate or write about what scenes might be occurring in the different countries.
  • Explore, what does breakfast look like in your country and in another country?
  • Make your own clock with a paper plate. Talk with a friend about what you do at different times of the day.
  • Look at a world map. Predict what time it is in different regions of the world.

The Golden Rule

When I read the current events of our world, I often feel overwhelmed by the challenges facing us as a global community. As an early childhood educator, I wonder, “what if our world leaders were required to return to kindergarten and learn the empathy basics, like The Golden Rule?” I don’t mean to simplify politics and struggles that run deep in history, but what if… Today I celebrate a timeless world classic about one simple rule.

Regional focus:  The Whole Wide World

Author:  Ilene Cooper

Illustrator: Gabi Swiatkowska

Genre:  Children’s literature

This book is a gentle reminder of a timeless rule for parent and child, Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.  Everyone knows a version of the Golden Rule. But what does it really mean? And how do you follow it? In this simple yet profound book, a grandfather explains to his grandson that the Golden Rule means you “treat people the way you would like to be treated. It’s golden because it’s so valuable, and a way of living your life that’s so simple, it shines.” Though it may be a simple rule, it isn’t easy to follow. Fortunately, following the Golden Rule is something everyone can do, which means that every person-old or young, rich or poor-can be a part of making the world a better place.

What I love:

  • The book has gorgeous and intriguing illustrations.
  • The book uses child appropriate language and stories to explore a challenging theme.
  • The story is a useful teaching tool for teachers with diverse student groups.
  • The Golden Rule can be used as a powerful introduction to exploring delicate current world events.

Themes: values, world culture, compassion, empathy

Discussion:

  • In your own words, describe the golden rule.
  • Have you recently practiced the golden rule? When? Why?
  • Have you recently seen an adult practicing the golden role? Who? When?  Why?

Connections:

  • Make a collage using recycled newspapers and magazines of people practicing the golden rule.
  • Ask adult friends to share world stories from history of people practicing the golden rule.
  • Create a play/theater of characters practicing the golden rule.