We’ve Got the Whole World in our Hands

Regional focus:  The Whole World

Author & Illustrator: Rafael Lopez

Genre:  children’s literature

Collecting my thoughts for Sail Away Story is a weekend indulgence.  My day job is Director of La Puerta Abierta School and Library in Santiago Atitlan, Guatemala.  Last month, our project embarked on a large-scale fundraising campaign to ensure a forever home for our school and outreach programs.  We’ve been busy sharing our story of growth and achievements with supporters and potential donors.

Recently I was challenged by a family friend from California who asked,  “How does a contribution to a school project in Guatemala affect me?”

For a second I was silent and stunned.  I felt myself crawling inward, like a turtle withdrawing into her shell; clearly the potential donor and I  had different global perspectives and priorities.  And then, I found my voice, which wasn’t exactly a roar,  but more like the steady and stable dialog of a melodious blackbird in my garden at  dawn.

“How does supporting education in Guatemala affect me?”

 Let’s talk!

We  live in a world that is an intricate  web of connections and interdependencies.  When we are encouraged to think about what is equitable and just, we can see beyond the initial “me.”  We become aware of the wider world and our role as global citizens.  We understand the complexities of social injustices and feel inspired to be agents of change for the well-being of our world.

If we are to examine the question in more tangible terms, we can connect current issues of immigration of Central Americans north, as they flee social and political injustices.  Among the long list of injustices sits the right to a dignified education.  While I understand that I am oversimplifying complex issues (I am a preschool teacher after all:), I recognize that if we, as global citizens were able to invest in education across boundaries, some families would have more investment in staying in their country of origin and have less necessity to flee.  And now let’s imagine that those children who stayed in their country of origin and received a dignified education grew up with the skills and tools to be agents of change, and then invested in their community, both locally and globally.  Might this one initial act of kindness affect you?  I’ll let you decide.

While I was born and raised in California, I have spent more than half my life in Central America.  My husband was born in Brazil and his parents are Belgian.

My daughters (E) who is twelve and (C) who is nine were born in Guatemala and their first words were in Spanish, “agua,” “mama” “nana.”

While there is a sprinkling of expatriates in our town, the foreign community is small, and my daughters are often asked in casual conversation to share their stories.  Visitors will probe, “Where are you from?”  What languages do you speak?”  “Who are you parents?”  and eventually, “What is you nationality?”

The last question in particular, one that seems simple and straight forward, takes curious minds down a windy road of explanation.  (E) might share that her mom is from the United States and that her father is Belgian, but born in Brazil, and that she was born in Guatemala and possesses both Guatemalan and US citizenship. At the end of the dialog, she’s likely to confess that she feels Guatemalan but looks North American.  (C) might say that technically she’s Guatemalan, but that she is also a mix of Belgium, the United States and Brazil.  After a long-winded dialog (she likes to talk), she’d reveal that she’s a global citizen, a child of the world.

At then, my heart skips a beat, as I imagine a world without boarders, where empathy flows across religion, culture and nationality. When packaged in a child’s perspective, world-peace almost seems attainable.

As I struggle to make sense of the psychology of adults, I often look to children’s books that illustrate in both words and pictures complicated topics in approachable packages.  The joyful picture book, We’ve Got the Whole World in our Hands, by Rafael Lopez gracefully brings insight into the concept of Global Citizenship.

The next time someone asks “How does supporting education in Guatemala affect me?” I’ll be better prepared.  I may suggest that they read We’ve Got the Whole World in our Hands, or invite them to join a class at La Puerta Abierta.  

I might simply share the wise words of Rafael Lopez, “It seems wherever we look these days, there is talk of the things that divide us.  With this book, I wanted to express a message of hope to children that we are all in this together, that each and every child is an essential part of the big, amazing planet we call home.”

About:

Lopez’s We’ve Got the Whole World in our Hands brings new life and perspective to a beloved  folk song first published in 1927.  Using the metaphor of a ball of yarn which soars across the book’s  pages, across boarders,  and with the aid of his vibrant illustrations, Lopez demonstrates how we are all connected and celebrated in the spirit of friendship,  love and peace.

What I love:

  • Lopez’s illustrations are cheerful and diverse.
  • Lopez uses a very simple concept as a tool for complex topics and discussion.
  • Lopez has also published a bilingual (English-Spanish) version of his book.

Discussion:

  • In your own words, what does the metaphor “We’ve got the whole world in our hands,” mean?
  • Have you ever helped another child, adult, or animal?  What inspired you to lend a hand? How did you feel while you were helping?
  • Do you feel that you are similar or different from children who live in other parts of the world?  Why or why not?

Connections:

  • Become a global citizen.  Learn about children from different cultures or countries than your own.
  • Create a collage of the diversity that can be found across the globe.  Keep in mind that there is diversity amongst people and geography.
  • Exchange letters with a pen-pal in another city, state or country.  Ask questions. Share stories.
  • Represent the metaphor “We’ve got the whole world in our hands,” in a drawing.

 

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We Are Grateful–Otsaliheliga

Regional focus: The Cherokee Nation, North America

Author:  Traci Sorell

Illustrator:  Frane Lessac

Genre:  children’s literature

I have lived in  an indigenous Maya community in Guatemala for 17 years now, nearly half of my life, and for most of my adult years.  While I am not an expert on the Tzutuhil Maya who have lived for generations in Santiago Atitlan, the village I call home, I have accumulated a deep appreciation and understanding of the Tzutuhil culture via daily immersion in a highland Maya town.

I grew up in California, which is also land deeply rooted in Native American history.  Ironically, I learned very little about Native American culture as a child.  What exposure I did receive about the indigenous people was generic and superficial.  I remember tasting fry bread at town fairs and assuming that the greasy snack was “authentic” and learning to make “leather” vests out of crinkled paper grocery bags around the time of Thanksgiving to replicate the clothing of  Native Americans.  Rarely did I learn of the cultural values, traditions, folklore or struggles of  Native Americans.

 I recently had the opportunity to travel to the East Coast of the United States with Ana, second-grade teacher at Puerta Abierta Atitlan.  The journey was a year-in-the-making colaboration between Living Threads Co. and The National Museum of Women in the Arts.  In addition to being a phenominal educator, Ana is also a valued artisan of the Mothers’ Artisan Initiative at La Puerta Abierta . She was selected to be the first recipient of the Global Artisan Exchange Scholarship via Living Threads Co.  I could dive into a deep tangent about our amazing week on the East Coast, but instead, I will encourage you to read more about our experience here.

When Ana was asked where she’d like to visit in DC on her free day, she quickly selected The Smithsonian Museum of the American Indian, and I was over the moon to join her. We walked the multi-story museum in awe of  artifacts and exhibits of the Native cultures of the Western hemisphere.  

While perusing the museum gift shop, I discovered Traci Sorell’s picture book “We are Grateful,” and instantly fell in love.  Perhaps her words won me over, or Frane Lessac’s bright and cheerful  illustrations caught my eye.  Maybe, in the moment, I was simply overcome with gratitude for the experience to be soaking in and celebrating indigenous culture with  a friend.   Most certainly, I was overjoyed to discover a beautiful children’s book that so accurately and honestly represented a deep value of the Cherokee Nation, otsaliheliga or, gratefulness.

About:

Traci Sorell introduces us to the Cherokee Nation concept of otsaliheliga, a word used to express gratitude.  As we journey through the year with a contemporary Cherokee family and their tribal nation, we learn how they  express thanks for celebrations big and small.

What I love:

  • I appreciate the contemporary descriptions and illustrations of a modern Cherokee family.
  • Sorell’s message of acknowledging gratitude in our day-to-day is valuable for both children and adults alike.
  • Lessac’s illustrations are colorful, innocent and expressive.
  • The book contains  Cherokee vocabulary and  syllabary.

Themes:  indigenous people, gratitude, seasons,  community

Discussion:

  • In your own words, what does gratitude mean?  What are you grateful for?
  • Does your community/family honor traditions or celebrations during the different seasons (winter, spring, summer, fall)?  If so, how do you celebrate them?
  • In We Are Grateful, we recognize that the Cherokee people express profound gratitude to Mother Earth for her many blessings ( crops, seasons, trees, snow, animals, etc.)  What are  you grateful for that can be found in your natural surroundings?

Connections:

  • Create your own gratitude book with pictures or  words describing what you are grateful for.
  • Learn more  about the Cherokee Nation here.
  • If you live in North, South or Central America, investigate what indigenous groups of people were present where you currently live prior to the discovery of the Americas by European explorers.

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On Family Engagement

Today’s Sail Away Story post is our second edition  of  “A Little Birdy Told Me…” in which I feature a guest writer who shares about her favorite cultural children’s books or global schools.

Meet Erin Conway–friend, teacher, writer, educational coach and weaver of both textiles and words–as she delves into the importance of a book concept in education  called Family Engagement.

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In her own words:

I am not old, but I have lived many teacher lives.  I began my professional career as a bilingual teacher in the Madison Metropolitan School District in Wisconsin, but my desire to seek a deeper understanding of my students and foster intercultural connections in the field of education lead me to accept a Peace Corps assignment in Guatemala.  It was during my Peace Corps years in Guatemala that I first met Amanda, and I have been fortunate to benefit from both personal and professional exchanges since then. For ten years (2005-2015), I worked both teaching and training teachers in Guatemala. These experiences were instrumental in crafting my instructional practices with expanded definitions of teacher and continue to impact my current work in outreach, coaching educators and consulting on multicultural/diverse literacy programs and resources in Wisconsin today.

“Who is your blog’s primary audience?” I asked Amanda shortly after I began writing.

“My best guess,” she responded. “Would be educators and parents and people who like me.”

I read those final words multiple times incorrectly as “People like me.”

And who are those people?

Like Amanda, I was an avid childhood reader, and books remain a means to both expand my world as I look forward, as well as make sense of my life as I look back. But, it was during a writing class my first few months in Wisconsin after returning from Guatemala that I voiced how integral books had been to my profession as much as my person. For the workshop, I had written a modern fairy tale about teaching and blank books, travelling and (re)writing your own story. The day my story was critiqued, I had stayed behind after class, sitting side by side with my writing instructor.

“What do you like about teaching?” she had asked while I bit back tears of embarrassment. My classmates’ comments had not been exactly what I expected. “The purpose for this story, you have to narrow it down.” The instructor was very matter of fact. “Why are you a teacher?”

Once upon a time, I had started professional development with questions like that with classroom teachers and parents, with children and adults. My mind shot to the books my mother had written with me. Recycled paper with stick figures and a few words. “The storytelling,” had slipped out with tears I’m not sure I hid.

If you are an adult and enjoy reading books suggested on this blog, you are not alone. My own analysis of diverse book lists for adults are too often crowded with VERY academic/thick texts. This research also tends to be EXTREMELY depressing which I do not believe is the most effective way to inspire human relationships or agency. If you are a classroom teacher and/or parent reading Sailaway Story, you may be familiar with the concept of Family Engagement. Family Engagement in education is best described as commitment and intention developed through communication between all parties, child, caregiver, school/community. This ideal influences how I select resources.

At its foundation, themes addressed by the books described are similar to those integral to other selected books on Sailaway Story’s blog: adolescent leaders, bravery, courage, hardship, friendship, kindness, ancestors, traditions, war, loss, memory, immigration, family, journey, community, responsibility, survival, optimism, empathy, hope. My focus on book groupings made up of diverse stories is the variety of formats (adult/juvenile non fiction, picture books, graphic novels, illustrated fiction, juvenile/adult fiction) in order to facilitate conversations across ages. I create these book clusters because it provides links into diverse literature that allows for all experience and reading levels to read on the topics and to encourage discussions beyond school walls.

Parents and classroom teachers, young and old, readers and listeners are all storytellers. No matter who you are, as you read I would encourage you to talk about:

  • What were your favorite books as a child?
  • How? Or, why are they still relevant today?
  • Do you see any of your favorites reflected in children’s selections?
  • How might a children’s book engage adults in conversation? And, vice versa, how might you encourage complex themes to be discussed with children?
  • What is your story? How would you tell it? In paragraphs, pictures, poetry?

In honor of the region of the world where Amanda and I first met, the first selections are all related to Latin America. I arranged them from general to specific to general in scope and somewhat chronologically.

Since the Peace Corps welcome packet had arrived at my door complete with a recommended reading list, I was familiar with U.S. intervention in Latin America. Amanda referenced this type of story in her previous selection of Caminar by Skila Brown. What I learned while reading Tango War: The Struggle for the Hearts, Minds and Riches of Latin America During World War II by Mary Jo McConahay was the fight for the allegiance of Latin America beginning during World War II and the impact still felt today. One example of the implications of World War II politics is detailed in the young adult book in verse Tropical Secrets: Holocaust Refugees in Cuba. Margarita Engle is a masterful voice of little known stories and her young adult novel in verse illustrates in the story of a young Jewish boy’s attempted escape from Europe the complex themes in McConahay’s large scope.

An Uninterrupted View of the Sky by Melanie Crowder speaks through present day voices about the same struggle for hearts, minds and riches of Latin America. In order to appease U.S. efforts to win the “war on drugs” Bolivia responded to pressure to make increased numbers of drug related arrests. Crowder’s novel follows the arrest of a father on false charges and sent to prison by a corrupt system that targets the uneducated, the poor, and the indigenous majority. The final books, a picture book and an adult novel, illustrate the narrative of immigration, its hope and its obstacles. In the Midst of Winter by Isabel Allende is narrated by three different people, a Chilean lecturer who completed her education in Canada after securing escape from Chile in the 1970s, a human rights professor, son of Jewish immigrants and an undocumented Guatemalan immigrant. Each one of them, if not in the political definition of the term, are dreamers. And, Dreamers by Yuyi Morales is the illustrated autobiography of her immigration story.

Recommended Websites:

http://www.tolerance.org/sites/default/files/documents/tt_abc_respect_for_families.pdf

https://www.edutopia.org/blog/kitchen-table-connections-re-envision-homework-clare-roach

socialjusticebooks.org

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“What do you like about teaching?” This question that I return to for purpose is the question I pose to you, Sailaway Story reader, because my heart will always be in the answer I gave to my writing teacher on that October evening with my own narrative swirling in red ink. It will be the same as my classroom days when I impressed upon my students that everything was a story and that the same story could be told in an unnamed number of ways. I am an educator. I am not a parent. I do like Amanda. And, the books we choose to read make us storytellers.

When I have the opportunity to post as a guest storyteller on Sailaway Story, my contribution will be to connect books that connect individuals to more ways, formats, languages, to tell and hear stories. I also manage a website and blog that can be found at www.erinconway.com where I often write about diverse books as both a reader and author. Previous publishing credits include the Midwest ReviewThe Sonder ReviewVine Leaves Press and Adelaide Literary Magazine.

La Puerta Abierta

 

Sail Away Story is a celebration of children’s books and innovative schools from  around the world, and while our lists of children’s books and juvenile novels continue to grow, our selection of innovative global schools remains small and incomplete.  I sigh and chuckle…why have I not written about la Puerta Abierta, the school I co-founded in rural Guatemala 12 years ago, the learning center I love and know intimately?   How does one begin to describe a “project” that feels much more like a daughter or a son, a living being that is growing, changing and evolving over time?  How can I find the objective voice in a creation that remains so close to my heart?  How do I wrap a school that I live, breath, experience every day into one short blog post?  I am still not sure, but the glass of wine at my side and the glorious setting sun over Lake Atitlan that meets me at my office window is offering guidance and support on the first night following the first day of school of the 2019 school year.

La Puerta Abierta which now hosts 118 students from preschool through fifth grade has grown into so much more than a school.  It’s a culture, an ambiance, a sentiment.

At the 4th grade parent orientation meeting last week, we shared hopes and dreams for the children of our families.  Words like empathy, humanity, friendship and generosity were bounced between the conversation as if they were common parts of speech.  My heart melted.  I remembered asking parents the same question 8 years ago when we welcomed our first group of students at our center.  The discussion was focused on academic accomplishments.  Parents had dreams of their 4 year olds learning to write, complete math equations and speak English in the duration of a year.  While I was touched by their ambitious scholastic dreams, I understood that a successful early childhood experience would also need to embody creative play, socialization, problem solving, and exploration.

Today I watched with a giant smile as those once preschool students walked confidently into 5th grade and were greeted by an amazing mentor and teacher who is committed to collaborating with them throughout the school year.  I observed our kindergarten class listen with captivation to a story read by their teacher under a tree in the school garden.  I saw Angel, our first autistic student join into the morning meeting in 2nd grade and I witnessed a new group of preschool students begin to play, explore, dream.  I watched Jaunita, the genuine and talented director of la Puerta Abierta, welcome parents with a warm “buenos dias,” as she was simultaneously greeted by new and old students with warm hugs.

Love.  Gratitude.  Kindness.  Creativity.  Compassion.  Ingenuity.  Appreciation.  Acceptance.  Integrity.  These are the ingredients for a dignified education. This is the recipe for la Puerta Abierta.

To learn more, please visit our webpage at www.atitlanabierta.com.

At the Same Moment Around the World

Regional focus:  The Whole Wide World

Author and Illustrator:  Clotilde Perrin

Genre:  children’s literature

It’s 9:00 am on a Sunday morning in Brussels, Belgium and the colors from my window have only now changed from black to gray.  My daughters are preparing for the cold outside as they layer their sleepy, warm,  bodies  in tights, pants, shirts, sweaters, scarves, thick socks and mittens.  Soon, they will journey to the neighborhood bakery for fresh croissants and petit pain au chocolat which they will bring back to the apartment in a paper bag.  In the meantime, I’ll heat milk for hot chocolate,  and water for black tea.

We are 7 hours earlier than our friends in Guatemala, three hours earlier that our friends in Brazil, 9 hours earlier than our family in California and 4.5 hours behind  our friends in India! These are the time zones I have saved on the world clock app on my iPhone.  Nearly every day my youngest child Chloe, will ask about her friends in various places around the world, and she will wonder where they are and what they are doing at the same exact moment.  When she is on the metro at 4:00 PM in Brussels, her best friend Lupita in Guatemala might be making tortillas with her mom where its 10:00 AM and her friend Khushi in the Indian Himalayas  might be crushing cardamom and ginger to make a spicy cup of chai tea to keep her warm where it’s 8:30 PM.  Chloe and I will marvel over the idea that not only the hour changes according to time zone, but also the daily activities of children around the world change.  Her morning commute to school in Guatemala which includes a tuc-tuc, a boat, and a walk looks very different from her Belgian cousin’s commute.   Nell rides her bike to school every morning.

As an adult I continue to be mesmerized by the mini worlds within our big world. The act of boarding a plane in Central America  and exiting an airport in Europe 15 hours later  still feels like a feat of the future, a science fiction fantasy.  I imagine the magic of travel is all the more potent for the child mind.

About:

In Clotilde Perrin’s whimsical book, At the Same Moment Around the World, we peek into the lives of individuals around the globe and catch a glimpse of the lives of Benedict drinking a cup of hot chocolate in France, Mitko catching the school bus in Bulgaria, and Lilu enjoying lunch on a Himalayan mountain. Clotilde Perrin takes readers eastward from the Greenwich meridian, from day to night, with each page portraying one of (the original) 24 time zones.

What I love:

  • Time zones are fascinating and confusing for children and adults alike.  “At the Same Moment Around the World” provides a fun and informative platform to teach children about the topic.
  • Perrin’s illustrations are whimsical and magical.
  • “At the Same Moment Around the World” creates a platform for young readers to learn about children in other countries and cultures.

Themes:  culture, time zones, diversity

Discussion:

  • Do you have friends who live in countries different from your own?  What do you think they are doing in this moment?
  • How is it possible that it might be day in one country and night in another?
  • What would snapshots of your day in different moments  look like (7:00 AM, 1:00 PM, 4:00 PM)?

Connections:

Sun Unit Study - Day and Night (4)

 

Reading Season

I am a book purist, a “one-book-at-a-time” type of reader. I like to devour a story, from start to finish, without mingling in other books simultaneously.

However, this month I have found myself buried in a sea of books, reading 6 novels and “involved” with two more. Caught between the pages of a plethora of titles has left me feeling somewhat scattered, and yet also invigorated.

In Guatemala, a common saying is “hay que aprovechar,” which translates to one must take advantage of a situation. The Guatemalan school year ends in late October and begins in mid January. The school calendar was originally designed to accommodate the coffee harvest and allow a break in the school year for children to participate in the cutting of coffee beans. While child labor continues to exist in many Central American countries, fewer youth are recruited during the non-school months to work in the fields today.

As a result, la Puerta Abierta “aprovecha” the months of November and December to engage with reading circles throughout the community of Santiago Atitlan and beyond. Currently we have 3 groups dedicated to older elementary school students, two groups dedicated to jr. high level students and three adult reading groups.

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In addition, I always have a book for myself at my bedside table and a chapter book that I read at night with my two daughters.

Why is the feat of reading 6 books invigorating? The act of loosing myself in multiple novels in truth is ambitious and somewhat overwhelming. However, what sharing books with numerous children, teens, and adults represents in wildly exciting. Rural Guatemala has one of the highest illiteracy rates in Central and South America. Books are hard to come by, and often too expensive for families to purchase. Hence a culture of readers is just beginning to emerge. Discussing The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate with a group of engaged 4th graders who are receiving their first novel is gratifying. Sitting in a circle with 10 teachers who are reading Before we were Free by Julia Alvarez and pondering questions of political freedom in a group setting is deeply rewarding.

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While the “vacation” months don’t necessarily feel like holiday as I meet with a variety of reading groups, I truly wouldn’t trade “reading season” for a month rest—that is, unless I could take my reading circles with me to a glorious beach in Mexico where we could discuss novels from our hammocks and sip cold coconut water.  Until then, meeting in our school, delving into books, and creating meaningful connections with literature will be just fine.

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The Reading Season Book List

  1.  The One and Only Ivan, Katherine Applegate, 4th grade reading circle
  2. Esperanza Rising, Pam Munoz Ryan, 5th grade reading circle
  3. The Only Road, Alexandra Diaz, 6th grade reading circle
  4. Percy Jackson and the Lightening Thief, Rick Riordon,  jr. high reading circle
  5. Before we were Free, Julia Alvarez, adult reading circle
  6. Like a Fish in a Tree, Lynda Mulally Hunt, adult reading circle
  7. Like Water For Chocolate, Laura Esquivel, adult reading circle

What I am reading just for me:

The Beautiful things that Heaven Bears, Dinaw Mengestu

What I am reading with my daughters E (12 years old) and C (9 years old):

Pax, Sara Pennypacker

DIA DE LOS MUERTOS

Regional focus:  Mexico

Author:  Roseanne Greenfield Thong

Illustrator:  Charles Ballesteros

Genre:  children’s literature

As a child, cemeteries scared me.  I wasn’t frightened of a potential encounter with a ghost nor was I afraid of bumping into a dancing skeleton.  In fact, ghosts and skeletons were whimsically enchanting to my child mind.  However, I was uneasy with the quietness, the sterile ambiance, the secluded locations that  accompanied cemeteries in the United States.  I grew up in Southern California, and I remember sitting in the back seat of my mom’s Honda Civic, as we drove on the freeways that linked the suburbs to  the Valley to greater Los Angeles, and wondering about the signs that lead to cemetaries in the distance.  They were often found a few miles away from the off-ramps, in unpopulated areas.  

My great-uncle died when I was 15, and his funeral was the first I remember attending.  The silence of the cemetery made me feel as if I needed to hold my breath, as if a simple exhalation would disrupt the balance of the quiet park.  Graves were placed in tidy rows, symmetrical and rectangular.  The green grass was short, freshly cut, too perfect.  And, I couldn’t wait to leave…to exhale, to talk, to feel.

I have lived abroad in Central America for nearly as long as I lived in the USA, first in Costa Rica, and for the past 15 years in Guatemala.  My first encounter with a cemetery in Costa Rica was immediate and striking.  Cemeteries in Latin America are often located in town centers and the bus I rode home from the university circled the local cemetery before chugging up the steep hill to my neighborhood.  The cemeteries were a colorful, chaotic collection of raised graves in a labyrinth of wavy  lines.  Often the ice-cream vendor would be selling home-made treats  for visitors to purchase at the entrance.  During the day, families and individuals passed through the cemetery to “saludar” a dead relative or simply to stroll to their next destination.  The cemetery was alive, and perhaps, for the first time in my adult life, I felt unafraid while visiting.  

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I have never experienced Dia de los Muertos in Mexico, but I have had the privilege of knowing  Dia de los Santos in Guatemala for the past 15 years.  On November 1st, families gather in our local cemetery to sit, to remember, and to honor their loved ones who have passed away.  Words can’t describe the holiday; truly it’s an event to feel.  Abuelos string their guitars and sing to their dead wives, candles twinkle in the night air, the tink-tink of the ice-cream cart dances through the graves.  There is laughter and there are tears.  There is no silence.  Flowers adorn tombs, both large and small.  Again, the cemetery is alive.

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While I acknowledge that mourning and death are strong and difficult topics to confront in any culture, I feel that when death is familiar, and not hidden, when death is a celebration of memories and not an overwhelming tragedy, death becomes a passage, a natural occurrence, a transition that doesn’t need to be laden in fear.

For this one simple reason (although there are many more), I appreciate the celebration of Dia de los Santos/Muertos and look forward to the yearly ritual to remember and honor those who are no longer with us, and poco a poco, I feel more comfortable with the theme of dying.  

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Dia de los Muertos by Roseanne Greenfield Thong is a fantastic tool for sharing the concepts of the holiday with children.  

About:

Dia de los Muertos introduces readers, both young and old, to the traditional holiday of Day of the Dead that is celebrated in Latin American countries on November 1st.   Thong writes in catchy rhymes which make her story fun and enjoyable to read aloud.  We learn of the tradition of creating and eating calaveras (sugar skulls), of decorating altars to honor the lives of those who have passed, and of visits to decorated cemetaries.

What I love:

  • I love that a holiday  that is unfamilar to many, now has a children’s book to explain it’s rituals and importance.
  • I love the joyful and colorul ilustations of Ballesteros.
  • I love that Thong weaves Spanish vocabulary into her story.

Themes: cultural festivities, ancestors, traditions

Discussion:

  • What is your favorite family celebration?
  • Has a person or an animal who was special to you died?  How do you remember him/her?
  • Do you think that our ancesters who have passed away can feel our presence when we celebrate them?  Why?  How?

Connections:

  • Make an altar to honor a special friend, family member or pet who has passed away.  Decorate your altar with photos, food that the person/pet enjoyed, flowers, and streamers.
  • Draw a picture of your favorite family celebration.
  • Print out and color a calavara.   Find  templates here and here.

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